img-news

Today's announcements and data releases, 6/12/2018

  • Regular
  • Economic Calender
  • 6 days ago
  • 12

All times in GMT+7, Jakarta, Bangkok

 

 

14:00

EUR German Factory Orders (MoM) (OCT)

 

14:00

EUR German Factory Orders n.s.a. (YoY) (OCT)

Measures the total change in orders placed at domestic manufacturers. The figure gives a picture of the strength of demand for German industrial products. Factory orders are an early indicator of the overall level of spending in the economy, and spending drives economic growth. Although higher German Factory Orders alone is not a strong enough factor to influence the value of Euro in a significant way, growth in orders can put upward pressure on the Euro if higher orders are due to greater demand aboard. German Factory Orders is a seasonally adjusted index. The headline figure is expressed as a percentage change in the index

 

14:30

EUR ECB's Guindos Speaks in Frankfurt

 

15:30

EUR Markit Germany Construction PMI (NOV)

 

16:05

AUD RBA's Debelle gives speech in Sydney

 

17:00

GBP BOE's Ramsden Speaks in London

 

19:30

USD Challenger Job Cuts (YoY) (NOV)

 

20:15

USD ADP Employment Change (NOV)

 

20:30

CAD International Merchandise Trade (Canadian dollar) (OCT)

 

The difference between imports and exports of goods. Merchandise Trade differentiates itself from Trade Balance because it does not record intangibles like services, only reporting on physical goods. Because exports of tangibles like oil, gold and manufacturing contribute to a large part of Canada 's GDP, trade data can give critical insight into developments in the economy and into foreign exchange rates.

Negative International Merchandise Trade (deficit) indicates that imports of goods are greater than exports. When exports are greater than imports, Canada experiences a trade surplus. Trade surpluses indicate that funds are coming into Canada in exchange for exported goods. Because such exported goods are usually purchased with Canadian dollars, trade surpluses usually reflect currency flowing into Canada, such currency inflows may lead to a natural appreciation of a the Canadian dollar, unless countered by similar capital outflows (Canadian International Securities Transactions tracks such capital flows). At a bare minimum, surpluses will buoy the value of the currency. There are a number of factors that work to diminish the market impact of Canadian Merchandise Trade on markets. The report is not very timely, released about three months after the reporting quarter. Developments in many of the components that comprise the figure are also usually well anticipated. Lastly, since the report reflect data for a specific reporting quarter, any significant changes in the Merchandise Trade should plausibly have been already felt during that quarter and not during the release of data. But because of the overall significance of Trade on Foreign Exchange Rates, the figure has a history of being one of the more important reports out of Canada . The headline figure for trade balance is expressed in millions of Canadian dollars and usually accompanied by a year-on-year percentage change figure

 

20:30

USD Trade Balance (OCT)

The US Trade Balance refers to the difference between exports of goods and services out of the US, and imports to America. The trade balance is one of the biggest components of the US's Balance of Payment, which gives valuable insight and heavy pressure on the value of the dollar. A positive Trade Balance (surplus) indicates that exports are greater than imports. When imports exceed exports, the US experiences a trade deficit. Because foreign goods are usually purchased using foreign currency, trade deficits usually reflect dollars leaking out of the country. Such currency outflows may lead to a natural depreciation of a dollar, unless countered by comparable capital inflows (US Net Foreign Security Purchases, or TICs data reports on such capital flows). At a bare minimum, deficits fundamentally weigh down the value of the currency. There are a number of factors that work to diminish the market impact of US Trade Balance. The report is not very timely, coming some time after the reporting period. Developments in many of the figure's components are also typically well anticipated. Lastly, since the report reflects data for a specific reporting month, any significant changes in the Trade Balance should plausibly have already been felt during that month and not during the release of data. However, because of the overall significance of Trade Balance data in forecasting trends in the Forex Market, the release has historically been one of the more important reports out of the US. The headline figure for trade balance is expressed in billion of dollars

 

20:30

USD Initial Jobless Claims (DEC 1)

 

 

20:30

USD Continuing Claims (NOV 24)

 

21:45

USD Markit US Composite PMI (NOV F) 

 

21:45

USD Market US Services PMI (NOV F)

 

22:00

CAD Ivey Purchasing Managers Index s.a. (NOV)

 

22:00

USD ISM Non-Manufacturing/Services Composite (NOV)

 

22:00

USD Factory Orders (OCT)

Dollar volume of new orders, shipments, unfilled orders and inventories as reported by domestic manufacturers. Factor Orders is not a widely watched economic release. The Advance Release on Durable Goods Activity reported one week earlier tends grab more market attention, given that durable goods make up more than half of factory orders. Factor Orders does provide a comprehensive look at the manufacturing sector. Specifically, the New Orders figure can act as a gauge of demand across industries while Shipments are indicative of supply. The Unfilled Orders and Inventory figures reconcile the balance between New Orders and Shipments; high Shipments are indicative of an excess of demand relative to supply, high Inventories signal an excess of supply over demand. Figures are reported in billions of dollars and also in percent change from the previous month

 

22:00

USD Factory Orders Ex Trans (OCT)

 

22:00

USD Durable Goods Orders (OCT F)

 

The value of orders placed for relatively long lasting goods. Durable Goods are expected to last more than three years. Such products often require large investments and usually reflect optimism on the part of the buyer that their expenditure will be worthwhile.

Because orders for goods have large sway over the actual production, this figure serves as an excellent forecast of U.S. output to come. Durable Goods are typically sensitive to economic changes. When consumers become skeptical about economic conditions, sales of durable goods are one of the first to be impacted since consumers can delay purchases of durable items, like cars and televisions, only spending money on necessities in times of economic hardship. Conversely, when consumer confidence is restored, orders for durable goods rebound quickly. The data is highly volatile as well, some volatility is eliminated with the Durable Goods Orders excluding Transportation figure, making it the more closely watched indicator.

The headline figure is expressed as a percentage change from previous months

 

22:00

USD Durables Ex Transportation (OCT F)

The headline figure is expressed as a percentage change from previous months.The Durable Goods Orders figure is also reported excluding transportation expenditures. Orders for items like civilian vehicles or aircrafts are fairly expensive and fluctuate idiosyncratically, distorting the Durable Goods Orders figure. Such goods are excluded to provide a better measure of durable goods orders

 

22:00

USD Cap Goods Orders Nondef Ex Air (OCT F)

 

22:00

USD Cap Goods Ship Nondef Ex Air (OCT F)

 

22:30

USD EIA Working Natural Gas Implied Flow (NOV 30)

 

22:30

USD EIA Natural Gas Storage Change (NOV 30)

 

23:00

USD DOE U.S. Crude Oil Inventories (NOV 30)

 

23:00

USD DOE Cushing OK Crude Inventory (NOV 30)

 

23:00

USD DOE U.S. Gasoline Inventories (NOV 30)

 

23:00

USD DOE U.S. Distillate Inventory (NOV 30)

 

23:30

USD U.S. to Sell 8-Week Bills

 

23:30

USD U.S. to Sell 4-Week Bills