img-news

Today's announcements and data releases, 18/1/2019

  • Regular
  • Economic Calender
  • 4 weeks ago
  • 27

All times in GMT+7, Jakarta, Bangkok

 

09:00

NZD Non Resident Bond Holdings (DEC)

The monetary value of bonds held by non residents of New Zealand . Non Resident Bond Holdings measure the willingness of foreigners to finance New Zealand 's economy and government. A high value is indicative of a budget deficit and debt, suggesting that foreign investments are required to finance New Zealand 's continued patterns of spending. The figure is also indicative of demand for the New Zealand Dollar. Because holding New Zealand bonds assumes the benefits and risks of holding New Zealand Dollars, changes in bond holdings can reflect changes in sentiment regarding the New Zealand economy, monetary policy, or political stability. Decreased demand for New Zealand securities reflects foreigners liquidating Kiwi assets, leading to more New Zealand Dollars in the market, thus weakening the New Zealand Dollar. The headline is the percentage of New Zealand government bonds that are held by foreigners.

 

11:30

JPY Capacity Utilization (MoM) (NOV)

 

11:30

JPY Industrial Production (MoM) (NOV F)

The volume of items produced in Japan 's mining and manufacturing industries. All products, whether sold domestically or abroad, are included in the calculation of industrial production. Industrial production is highly sensitive to the business cycle and can often predict future changes in employment, earnings, and personal income. For these reasons industrial production is considered a reliable leading indicator that conveys information about the overall health of the Japanese economy.

 

11:30

JPY Industrial Production (YoY) (NOV F)

 

14:30

CHF Producer & Import Prices (MoM) (DEC)

Tracks inflation in producer and import prices in Switzerland . The headline figure is the percentage change in the index from the previous period. Changes in this index will generally precede changes in the consumer price index, as higher import costs and producer prices tend to eventually be passed to consumers. As with any indicator of inflation, increases in producer and import prices tend to act as an appreciating weight for the Swiss franc because inflationary pressures are almost always met with interest rate increases from the Swiss central bank. The figure represents changes in the combined producer and import price index, calculated from changes in producer prices and import prices, giving appropriate weight to the proportion of domestic and imported goods.

 

14:30

CHF Producer & Import Prices (YoY) (DEC)

 

16:00

EUR Euro-Zone Current Account s.a. (euros) (NOV)

 

Summarizes the flow of goods, services, income and transfer payments in and out of the Euro-zone nations to other countries. The report gauges how the Euro-zone nations' interact with the rest of the world. Current Account is one of the three components that make up a country's Balance of Payments (Financial Account, Capital Account and Current Account). Where the other side of the Balance of Payments, Capital and Financial Accounts deal mainly with financial assets and investments, the Current Account gives a detailed breakdown of how the country interacts with rest of the global economy on a non-investment basis.

The Current Account tracks the trade balance (exports and imports for goods and services), income payments (such as interest, dividends and salaries) and unilateral transfers (aid, taxes, and one-way gifts). A positive value (current account surplus) indicates that the flow of capital from these components into the Euro-zone exceeds the capital leaving the Euro-zone. A negative value (current account deficit) means that there is a net capital outflow from the Euro-zone. Persistent Current Account deficits may lead to a depreciation of a currency, as trade, income and transfer payments usually reflect that Euros are leaving the Euro Area to make payments abroad. Conversely, underlying surpluses act as an appreciating weight on the Euro. The Euro-zone has a historically had an export oriented economy and has relied on exports as the engine for economic expansion. To this day, trade surpluses form the foundation of Euro-zone current account surpluses. There are a number of factors that often work to diminish the impact of the Current Account release on the market. The report is not very timely; released monthly at least a month after the reporting period. In addition, many of the components that lead to the final Current Account, such as production and trade figures, are known well in advance. Lastly, since the report reflects data for a specific reporting month, any significant developments in the Current Account should theoretically have been already felt during that quarter.

But just like GDP and Trade Balance, Current Account is central to forecasting long term developments in foreign exchange rates. It gives a detailed picture of how the Euro-zone's aggregate economy interacts internationally, breaking down these exchanges into separate components that can be tracked and often anticipated. Thus the weight of the Current Account has led it historically to be one of the more important reports out of the Euro-zone. The headline figure is expressed in billions of Euros.

 

16:30

GBP Retail Sales Ex Auto Fuel (MoM) (DEC)

 

16:30

GBP Retail Sales Ex Auto Fuel (YoY) (DEC)

 

16:30

GBP Retail Sales Inc Auto Fuel (MoM) (DEC)

 

16:30

GBP Retail Sales Inc Auto Fuel (YoY) (DEC)

 

20:30

CAD International Securities Transactions (Canadian dollar) (NOV)

 

The difference between imports and exports of goods. Merchandise Trade differentiates itself from Trade Balance because it does not record intangibles like services, only reporting on physical goods. Because exports of tangibles like oil, gold and manufacturing contribute to a large part of Canada 's GDP, trade data can give critical insight into developments in the economy and into foreign exchange rates.

Negative International Merchandise Trade (deficit) indicates that imports of goods are greater than exports. When exports are greater than imports, Canada experiences a trade surplus. Trade surpluses indicate that funds are coming into Canada in exchange for exported goods. Because such exported goods are usually purchased with Canadian dollars, trade surpluses usually reflect currency flowing into Canada, such currency inflows may lead to a natural appreciation of a the Canadian dollar, unless countered by similar capital outflows (Canadian International Securities Transactions tracks such capital flows). At a bare minimum, surpluses will buoy the value of the currency. There are a number of factors that work to diminish the market impact of Canadian Merchandise Trade on markets. The report is not very timely, released about three months after the reporting quarter. Developments in many of the components that comprise the figure are also usually well anticipated. Lastly, since the report reflect data for a specific reporting quarter, any significant changes in the Merchandise Trade should plausibly have been already felt during that quarter and not during the release of data. But because of the overall significance of Trade on Foreign Exchange Rates, the figure has a history of being one of the more important reports out of Canada . The headline figure for trade balance is expressed in millions of Canadian dollars and usually accompanied by a year-on-year percentage change figure.

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index (DEC)

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index n.s.a. (MoM) (DEC)

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index (YoY) (DEC)

The key gauge for inflation in Canada . Simply put, inflation reflects a decline in the purchasing power of the Canadian Dollar, meaning each Dollar buys fewer goods and services. CPI is the most obvious way to measure changes in purchasing power - the report tracks changes in the price of a basket of goods and services that a typical Canadian household might purchase. An increase in the index indicates that it takes more Dollars to purchase this same set of basic consumer items. As the most important indicator of inflation in Canada , Consumer Price figures are closely followed by Canada 's central bank. The Bank of Canada has a target inflation band of 1 - 3 % and uses CPI and Core CPI as its principle gauge (the Bank of Canada posts inflation targets and CPI on their homepage). A rising CPI may prompt the central bank to raise interest rates in order to manage inflation and slow economic growth. Higher interest rates make holding the Dollar more attractive to foreign investors, and this higher level of demand will place upward pressure on the value of the Dollar.

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index Core (YoY) (DEC)

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index Core - Median (YoY) (DEC)

 

20:30

CAD Consumer Price Index Core - Trim (YoY) (DEC)

 

21:05

USD Fed’s Williams Speaks on Economic Outlook and Monetary Policy 

 

21:15

USD Industrial Production (MoM) (DEC)

 

21:15

USD Manufacturing (SIC) Production (DEC)

 

21:15

USD Capacity Utilization (DEC)

Capacity Utilization measures the extent to which U.S. manufacturing companies make use of their installed productive capacity (factories and machinery). Capacity Utilization reflects overall growth and demand in the economy, rising when the economy is vibrant, and falling when demand softens. High capacity utilization also exerts inflationary pressures as scarce resources are in higher demand. However, it may also lead to new capital investments, such as new plants, that promote growth in the future.

 

22:00

USD U. of Mich. Sentiment (JAN P)

 

22:00

USD U. of Mich. Current Conditions (JAN P)

 

22:00

USD U. of Mich. Expectations (JAN P)

 

22:00

USD U. of Mich. 1 Yr Inflation (JAN P)

 

22:00

USD U. of Mich. 5-10 Yr Inflation (JAN P)

 

23:00

USD Fed’s Harker Speaks Symposium on Prosperity